The Personal Project and Caring Practitioners

  • Caring:

We show empathy, compassion, and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us. (MYP: From principles into practice, 2014)

What stood out most to me as a new MYP teacher was firstly the connectedness of MYP teachers around the globe, and secondly, their openness and willingness to share resources and ideas about best practice. I’ve come to increasingly realize that an openness and willingness to share best practice and resources is one of the fundamental dispositions of MYP teachers, as this is one of the many ways in which we strive to model the characteristics of the IB learner profile of caring to our students, colleagues and our communities. Sharing expertise and resources is truly a means of serving one another.

The personal project is a significant aspect of MYP students demonstrating the characteristics of the IB learner profile attributes. The personal project has also proven to be a significant aspect of coordinators and supervisors demonstrating what it means to be a caring learner by serving one another through sharing personal project resources and reflections on best practice. As a coordinator and supervisor in an isolated school with very limited access to collaborating with colleagues from other schools, I have been so very fortunate to gather personal project resources from many coordinators and teachers as they have demonstrated what it means to be a caring learner committed to the service of others.

In August of 2018, Hodder Education will be releasing Personal Project: Skills for Success – a personal project resource that I have co-authored with the extremely talented MYP-guru, Angela Stancar-Johnson. Hodder Education has also released this as a Student eTextbook. It has truly been a privilege to model the IB learner profile of caring in service to not just to my own colleagues and students, but also beyond, to MYP schools around the globe. It is our hope that this resource is a valuable tool that schools, coordinators, supervisors, teachers and of course, students, can employ to create their unique approach to a successful personal project engagement.

Embedded below is just a small taste of what is included in the Personal Project Skills for Success book. We have followed a similar process to the embedded Google Slide Decks, however, we have had the time and creative license to go much further and provide multiple other options for personal project success.

  • Welcome to the IB MYP Personal Project
    1. Introduction
  • The Personal Project Cycle
    1. The interactive, iterative nature of the MYP Projects Cycle
  • The Personal Project Supervisor
    1. The What, How and Why of Personal Project Supervision
  • Investigating
    1. Establishing a goal and context
    2.  Identifying prior learning and subject-specific knowledge
    3.  Research and academic honesty
  • Planning
    1. Developing criteria for success
    2. Planning for success
    3. Self-management
  • Taking action
    1. Creating product/outcome
    2. Thinking skills
    3. Social and Communication skills
  • Reflecting
    1. Self-assessment and evaluation
    2. Knowledge of topic and context
    3. Self as IB learner
  • Reporting the Journey
    1. Guidelines
    2. Task-specific clarifications

In the spirit of service, these Google Slide Decks can be easily copied to your personal drive. You are welcome to use as necessary and adjust to reflect the needs of your students and school context.

Sources: MYP Projects, 2014; Further guidance MYP Projects, 2016. Featured Image by Cuby Design from Noun Project. 

5 thoughts on “The Personal Project and Caring Practitioners

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  1. Thanks for pointing me to this on the older Personal Project post! This is so helpful. I hate to ask for more, but could you explain how we can download those slideshows like it says at the bottom? I can’t find the option. Thank you so much.

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